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It’s As Healthy To Eat Bugs As It Is To Eat Steak, Study Says

Think nothing can take the place of a juicy, perfectly cooked burger? Try a plate of fried grasshoppers.

Okay, so they won’t exactly taste the same — and it may be tough to even stomach the thought of munching on bugs. But experts say that nutritionally speaking, they’re a good substitute for beef, and may be a valuable food source of the future.

The idea of eating insects isn’t new. They’ve long been included in traditional diets of cultures around the world, and a 2013 report from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations noted that more than 1,900 insect species have been documented as food sources globally.

Americans aren’t so keen on consuming the critters, but bugs have crept into some Western food products in recent years. Cricket flour, for example, has become a popular ingredient in the high-protein, low-carb Paleo diet. (One tester’s verdict on crickets in chocolate chip cookies? Tastes like walnuts!)

Read Amanda MacMillan‘s Huffington Post article here

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These Seattle restaurants serve bugs (on purpose)

Water beetles the size of a Post-It note are on the menu at Nue, a trendy restaurant on Capitol Hill. They’re full-bodied, winged, and you have to suck the meat from their abdomens.

Nearby at Poquitos, an upscale Mexican restaurant, are spicy chapulines, or grasshoppers, that taste vaguely of flour.

And down the hill, about once a year, The Carlile Room has snails on the menu. These are fancy snails, $76 for 8 ounces, and they are raised lovingly at a modest escargotiere on the Olympic Peninsula run by Ric Brewer.

“We’re eating bugs every day whether we know it or not — might as well do it purposefully,” Brewer said. “It’s growing but not quite a huge industry yet. It will be as traditional protein prices go up.”

Some Seattle chefs are experimenting with bugs – full of protein, low in fat, they say – at restaurants across Seattle. Some of these aren’t too surprising (grasshoppers), but others ask more of their diners, like the water beetle, which looks like a cockroach and tastes like an apple Jolly Rancher dipped in salt.

Read the rest of ‘s article on kuow.org