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It’s As Healthy To Eat Bugs As It Is To Eat Steak, Study Says

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Think nothing can take the place of a juicy, perfectly cooked burger? Try a plate of fried grasshoppers.

Okay, so they won’t exactly taste the same — and it may be tough to even stomach the thought of munching on bugs. But experts say that nutritionally speaking, they’re a good substitute for beef, and may be a valuable food source of the future.

The idea of eating insects isn’t new. They’ve long been included in traditional diets of cultures around the world, and a 2013 report from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations noted that more than 1,900 insect species have been documented as food sources globally.

Americans aren’t so keen on consuming the critters, but bugs have crept into some Western food products in recent years. Cricket flour, for example, has become a popular ingredient in the high-protein, low-carb Paleo diet. (One tester’s verdict on crickets in chocolate chip cookies? Tastes like walnuts!)

Read Amanda MacMillan‘s Huffington Post article here

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The worm has turned: how British insect farms could spawn a food revolution

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An exciting article in the Guardian on the increase in bug production in the UK.

It talks about the UK’s 1st cricket farm in Cumbria, a partnership by the eatgub guys and Howard Bell.

The article mentions Edible bug farm who farm mealworms. The Brighton Bug Boys who are working on modular, phone box-sized insect farms that can be connected together to make larger facilities. Jiminy’s Cricket Farm in Northampton who is also looking to produce cricket flour.

I hope they get the all clear for their cricket farm as it could lead to lower cricket flour prices which is good for everyone.

Read the full article here

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Pestaurant at Northeast PA Home Showcase

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Are you going to the Northeast PA Home Showcase at the Mohegan Sun Hotel and Convention Center, Route 315, Plains Township between March 4th and the 6th???

if you are you have the chance to sample more than just home improvement advice by visiting the “Pestraurant” stand and perhaps taste some of the items that they have including crickets, mealy worms along with lollipops with ants inside them.

The Pestaurant will also be running a charity cricket eating contest where people can see how many crickets they can eat in an bid to raise local awareness of hunger issues.

“In the contest we’ll have regular, unflavoured crickets,” Wes Rost a representative of Ehrlich, “your local pest control expert,” which is a major sponsor of the Home Showcase said. “For people who are not quite that adventuresome, we’ll have some flavoured ones.”

Tickets for the event are $5.00

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Food of the future: insect burgers and personalised meals delivered by drone

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Burgers made of insects, farmers using satellites to track cows and sheep and personalised meals delivered to doorsteps by drones: these are just some of the ideas of how food could be produced in the future.

A major summit is being held by the UK’s food standards watchdogs this week to look at how changes to global food systems will impact on the country in the next few decades.

Around 200 experts will meet on Thursday at the Our Food Future event organised by the Food Standards Agency and Food Standards Scotland to discuss issues ranging from the impact of climate change and volatile prices, to the problem of obesity and how technology could transform eating habits.

Dr Richard Swannell, director of sustainable food systems at waste reduction charity Waste and Resources Action Programme (Wrap), who is speaking at the conference pointed out insect protein was already being used in animal feeds and there was a range of potential alternatives to meat which may be used for human food in the future.

“We have already got mycoprotein on our shelves, the Quorn approach, but there are other things like algae, such as seaweed, and a range of potential proteins that may not just be for animal feed but also for us as humans,”

Read Judith Duffy‘s full article in Scotland’s The Herald newspaper here

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Surprising diet myths and predictions of an insect-filled future

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By Randy Shore, Vancouver Sun February 12, 2016

An article on 100 Million Years of Food the new book from Stephen Le a Biological anthropologist from the Department of Biology at the University of Ottawa, Canada. The book discusses the evolution of the human diet and some of the topics covered are:

  • Is a Paleo/ low diet healthy
  • Why is it difficult to loose weight
  • Can eating vegetables improve your health

Going through the history of the human diet from our hunter gather days, the first days or agriculture to the ongoing mixed messages on fat and cholesterol.

Le also discusses how insects will become more accepted as a food source in the future, something that he researched in various parts of the globe, where he discovered that the western diet has started to turn people off their insect eating traditions.

You can read the article here and more on Stephen at his website here

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Locust pizzas and bug burgers: Man eats crawling insects in food to stay away from heart problem

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Article in International Business Times by Ritwik Roy about Peter Bickerton who for the last five years has included insects; mainly waxworms, locust and crickets after family health scares.

This article can be read here and the origianl Mirror newspaper story here.

 

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Eating Stink Bugs Could Boost Health in Africa

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A new study has identified essential nutrients in an edible insect known as stink bug and suggests it as an alternative food source to help meet the dietary demands of an increasing human population.

Researchers from Kenya and Zimbabwe collected stink bugs and searched for chemical components such as antioxidants, amino acids, essential fatty acids and toxins.

The researchers identified seven essential fatty acids for human nutrition and health out of the ten they found, four flavonoids and 12 amino acids, including two considered to be the most limiting in cereal-based diets.

Read the full article on All Africa.com here

 

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Would you eat a protein bar made of CRICKETS?

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People have been eating insects in South East Asia – and on I’m A Celebrity for years, but now the practice is going mainstream as a protein bar made with ground crickets hits shop shelves.

Available online and at select food stores in London for £18 for a box of eight, the makers of Crobar say it is an ‘all natural protein bar made with peanut and cricket flour’.

Crobar founder Christine Spliid, originally from Denmark but living in London, created the protein bars after learning about the health benefits of eating insects while she traveled the world, in particular South East Asia.

According to the Crobar website, gathrfoods.com, crickets are as high in protein as beef but contain more iron, magnesium and zinc, plus they offer all nine essential amino acids and high levels of Vitamin B12.

It said eating insects is also more environmentally friendly.

Christine explained on the site: ‘It is indisputable that current meat production is unsustainable, and we need to seriously look at other food and protein sources.

‘Farming insects is much more sustainable than farming cattle and chicken, and there is no rational reason why we don’t already eat insects in the West.’

But this bug-packed treat is relatively tame compared with the array of bizarre-flavoured snacks on offer around the world from wasabi Kit Kats and pizza slushies to spaghetti Bolognese ice lollies.

If a cricket flour protein bar isn’t too much for you to stomach, the raw horse meat ice cream available in Japan almost certainly will be. FEMAIL examines the strangest snacks in supermarkets around the world.

Read Caroline Garners full article on the Mail online