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Grow mealworms at home

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Throw away your vegetable waste caddy, there’s a new way to recycle the kitchen scraps into food in the kitchen..The Hive from Livinfarms.

It’s not cheap at around $600 but you could turn those kitchen scraps and some oats into mealworms (up to 500g every week). The Austrian firm started by Katharina Unger and Julia Kaisinger was funded through kickstarter and due to ship in 2016. Read more in the article in Good

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Locust pizzas and bug burgers: Man eats crawling insects in food to stay away from heart problem

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Article in International Business Times by Ritwik Roy about Peter Bickerton who for the last five years has included insects; mainly waxworms, locust and crickets after family health scares.

This article can be read here and the origianl Mirror newspaper story here.

 

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5 Compelling Reasons You Should Eat More Insects (Especially Crickets)

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The very thought of eating insects grosses people out. The image of a creepy, crawly, bug working its way down your windpipe doesn’t exactly conjure up feelings of the contentment we feel with other foods.

But why not? How is it that a cow, pig, chicken, or fish seem more appetizing than other creatures? In other cultures who don’t have the “luxury” of consuming conventional sources of protein regularly, insects are a perfectly legitimate choice. In fact, 2 billion people worldwide eat insects regularly as a food source, and North America is JUST starting to catch on.

If you’re not sure yet, consider these 5 compelling reasons you should consider eating more insects.

  • Packed with nutrition
  • Great survival food
  • More sustainable and better for the planet
  • Form of pest control
  • Food security for impoverished countries

Read Derek Henry‘s full article in Natural News here

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Eating Stink Bugs Could Boost Health in Africa

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A new study has identified essential nutrients in an edible insect known as stink bug and suggests it as an alternative food source to help meet the dietary demands of an increasing human population.

Researchers from Kenya and Zimbabwe collected stink bugs and searched for chemical components such as antioxidants, amino acids, essential fatty acids and toxins.

The researchers identified seven essential fatty acids for human nutrition and health out of the ten they found, four flavonoids and 12 amino acids, including two considered to be the most limiting in cereal-based diets.

Read the full article on All Africa.com here

 

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Would you eat a protein bar made of CRICKETS?

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People have been eating insects in South East Asia – and on I’m A Celebrity for years, but now the practice is going mainstream as a protein bar made with ground crickets hits shop shelves.

Available online and at select food stores in London for £18 for a box of eight, the makers of Crobar say it is an ‘all natural protein bar made with peanut and cricket flour’.

Crobar founder Christine Spliid, originally from Denmark but living in London, created the protein bars after learning about the health benefits of eating insects while she traveled the world, in particular South East Asia.

According to the Crobar website, gathrfoods.com, crickets are as high in protein as beef but contain more iron, magnesium and zinc, plus they offer all nine essential amino acids and high levels of Vitamin B12.

It said eating insects is also more environmentally friendly.

Christine explained on the site: ‘It is indisputable that current meat production is unsustainable, and we need to seriously look at other food and protein sources.

‘Farming insects is much more sustainable than farming cattle and chicken, and there is no rational reason why we don’t already eat insects in the West.’

But this bug-packed treat is relatively tame compared with the array of bizarre-flavoured snacks on offer around the world from wasabi Kit Kats and pizza slushies to spaghetti Bolognese ice lollies.

If a cricket flour protein bar isn’t too much for you to stomach, the raw horse meat ice cream available in Japan almost certainly will be. FEMAIL examines the strangest snacks in supermarkets around the world.

Read Caroline Garners full article on the Mail online